Extra Credit Reading List

Whether you are looking for material to pass the time this summer, or wanting to augment the literature part of a class, you may find these lists helpful. There is a mix of important classic works and contemporary fiction and nonfiction.

Dear Families,

This list started as a record of many books my family read out loud to each other. Over several years I have added more, all the while trying to choose those with redemptive themes.


Books are chosen for their interest and integrity; many are nonfiction and students have found them to be well worth their time. Students starting class in the fall can enter with up to 300 points of credit to be added into their first semester scores. Note that there are varying points assigned to each piece of literature so that you can add up what your goal may be.


Those wishing to learn about honors reading credit can find more information here: Honors Details


TO GET CREDIT: Please drop me an email at shumanhw@gmail.com and let me know when you have completed a book. We'll set up a few minutes to discuss the book by phone. It's easy!


Click on a book's name for more details.


Multicultural Lit & Comp

Optional Reading - Click names for details:

(If you'd like to read something from the AP/BL list below, drop me a note first!)

Black Count, The by Tom Reiss (100 pts)
Tom Reiss tells a story of General Alexander Dumas, who served with honor in the French Revolution though he was the son of a black slave and born in Haiti. Dumas's son went on to write The Count of Monte Cristo and The Three Musketeers, basing many exciting scenes on the real adventures of his father. Reiss writes that the general "rose higher in the white world than any man of his race would before our time" before he met an enemy he could not defeat . . . . This newly researched book is a good read for those who like true adventure stories.
Boy Who Harnessed the Wind, The by William Kamkwamba (100 pts)
You will like this book if you like TED talks and STEM classes, if you are interested in African life today (this takes place in Malawi), or you just like an amazing story about a student your age. The son of Christian parents, William is like my step-son Kris; he always has bolts and washers and bits of this and that in his pockets, and loves to see how things work. How can someone like this change a whole village, and maybe a whole country?
Boys in the Boat, The by Daniel James Brown (100 pts)
Rowing is traditionally considered a rich man's sport, but in 1936 an Olympic team from Seattle was unlike any elite crew that had ever won the US Olympic preliminary competitions. This was a time of national poverty, the Dust Bowl, and the clandestine plans of Adolf Hitler to make the 1936 games show off the wealth of his visions. This book is incredibly interesting, focusing on one tough rower and his hardworking crew in this very interesting time of history. You don't have to know rowing to enjoy the book.
Chosen, The by Chaim Potok (100 pts)
This friendship story of two Jewish boys in Brooklyn near the end of WW2 reveals different perspectives of two devout groups regarding what was next for the forming of a Jewish nation. I learned much about discussions in this faith as well as life at this time of history, thanks to Chaim Potok who is a rabbi as well as popular American author.
City of Thorns: Nine Lives in the World's Largest Refugee Camp by Ben Rawlence (100 pts)
City of Thorns is a nonfiction account of the plight of half a million people who live in Dadaab, a 30-square-mile make-shift city in the desert of Kenya. Unable to legally work or build permanent homes, residents of Dadaab have resorted to a hard life for almost 30 years. Excellent read for anyone working with refugees in Clarkston or elsewhere.
Coach Wooden and Me by Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (100 pts)
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar is the NBA's all time leading scorer and a Basketball Hall of Fame inductee. Coach Wooden has been called the "greatest coach in basketball history," and both Wooden and Abdul-Jabbar have received Presidential Medals of Freedom. In the middle of the accolades is a heart-felt story of 50 years of partnership between a wise coach and a hard-working athlete, both wanting to affect culture for good, and both with love for basketball and baseball.
Daughters of Islam by Miriam Adeney (100 pts)
Though I have read a number of books about Middle Eastern life and perspectives, this one was particularly helpful since it challenged some of my cookie-cutter ideas of what "missions" means. I believe it helpful for Christian women wanting to understand and communicate with Muslim neighbors.
Death of a King: The Real Story of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s Final Year by Tavis Smiley (100 pts)
Dr. King's usual biographical material is pulled from his "I have a dream" time period, but much went on in his last year of life that has not been told. Smiley writes a well researched and interesting chronology of the last 12 months, giving dignity to King's final vision and purpose.
Design of Everyday Things, The by Donald A. Norman (100 pts)
Do you get frustrated with mechanical things that do not work intuitively? Donald Norman writes a readable book of observations and guidelines, concluding that "humans do not always err. But they do when the things they use are badly conceived and designed." If you like to discover how things work, or invent/design things yourself, or just want to appreciate those who do, you will enjoy this book; it has even been included for reading in a GA Tech design class.
Endurance by Alfred Lansing (100 pts)
This is the story of Ernest Shackelton's survival as his trip across Antarctica goes against his plan. An eventful tale of 28 men and their various motivations to stay alive, and a beautiful account of a cold wasteland. Lansing's most famous book has scenes you will not forget. A book the Shumans read out loud with each other.
Extraordinary, Ordinary People by Condoleezza Rice (100 pts)
Former Secretary of State and first black woman to hold that office, Condoleezza Rice tells her story about growing up in Birmingham, Alabama, during the Civil Rights era. High school students would appreciate her inside looks into political office, attending and teaching at Stanford University, and foreign policy.
Faithful Women and Their Extraordinary God by Noël Piper (100 pts)
Five rather short but well-written bios of historic and contemporary women from various cultures: Sarah Edwards, Lilias Trotter, Gladys Aylward, Esther Ahn Kim, and Helen Roseveare. My husband couldn't help reading the last chapter out loud. The author tells their stories and then gives her own brief take-aways.
Gifted Hands by Ben Carson and Cecil Murphy (100 pts)
Once on everyone's reading list, this book belongs on ours. I recently reread it in two days because it was so interesting, and I loved the details of this neurosurgeon's life. Even though I'm queasy and uneducated about medical procedures, the back chapters' explanations of surgeries are understandable and exciting. Good book for family reading.
Gone: A Girl, a Violin, a Life Unstrung by Min Kym (100 pts)
This is an autobiography of a child prodigy and a story of her relationship with her instrument. Her million-dollar violin was stolen several years ago and made international news. Along with reading the book, you should hear some of the music she mentions, since the actual pieces are keyed to sections of the book and suggested for listening.
Great Quake, The: How the Biggest Earthquake in North America Changed Our Understanding of the Planet by Henry Fountain (100 pts)
Henry Fountain spent years investigating how the 1964 Alaskan earthquake affected not only people’s lives, the terrain, and local business, but also the study of how earthquakes come about on our planet. If you are science-minded—you will enjoy this book. If you aren’t but want to appreciate geology and other earth sciences, you can learn easily as you progress through a very readable account of this record-breaking event in American history and theories attached to it. We enjoyed reading it out loud!
Hard Times by Charles Dickens (100 pts)
A shorter Dickens novel. One of my friends really likes this one, so I started it three times. This summer's road trip was the winning situation; I listened to a library copy with reader Patrick Tull. This time I could follow who was who because Tull has a voice for everyone, and keeps the story going. The tale is a sometimes-dark fight between the idea that all we need for understanding are facts/science/math and the idea that imagination/the arts/wonder/questioning are intrinsic to a worthwhile life. Try this with the audio, at least to get started. I finished by reading pages, and really enjoyed the book and message.
I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban by Malala Yousafzai (100 pts)
If you have not heard of this young woman, who turned 18 in July 2015, you can skim her Wiki bio. What she tells of her family's struggles in Pakistan gives a view of what has been happening in the Middle East in the last few years. She published a new prologue in June 2015. I learned from this smart young author who does not whine as she tells her story.
It's a Jungle Out There, Life Is a Jungle, and Jungle Calls by Ron Snell (200 pts for all 3)
Nonfiction stories my family has read out loud three times now, laughing sometimes while amazed at what two brothers learn in their rainforest life and trips back to the States. This is an autobiographical account of a missionary kid and his brother growing up in Peru with a "risk-everything," ex-military father and a careful mom. These are fast-moving adventures that continue through Ron's college days in Chicago ("snakes in the dorm" and other great stories).
Life in Motion: An Unlikely Ballerina by Misty Copeland (100 pts)
Life in Motion: An Unlikely Ballerina - Misty Copeland, the American Ballet Theatre's first black principal dancer, tells of her challenge to move from a child of little privilege on through the hard choices that led her to the ABT. Very readable for those who are curious about the life of a professional ballerina or who wonder how Copeland persevered as an African American in a traditionally white field.
Macbeth, Julius Caesar, Othello, Taming of the Shrew, Midsummer Night’s Dream, The Tempest by Shakespeare (75 pts each)
Grab some friends and read these aloud? Take your time and use a Folger edition if possible to have summaries and footnotes available. Watch for quotable quotes and timeless themes. Listen along with an audio version if you wish.
One Thousand Gifts by Ann Voskamp (100 pts)
Hard to find good things to think about when you are angry? Mrs. Voskamp's journal-style writing deals honestly with her disappointments with God, even the death of her sister. Her beautiful writing style includes original words (Gerard Manley Hopkins comes to mind) and juxtaposed tones as she finds joy as a young Christian wife and mother on a Canadian farm.
Oswald Chambers: Abandoned to God by David Macasland (100 pts)
A real surprise for me! I expected an elder-statesman type of man, but found a young man talented in the arts, who focused his life and went for what was important to him in his search for truth. Brings new energy to the devotions my family often reads.
Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell (100 pts)
One out of a best-selling series of Gladwell books; this one looks at what creates success based on empirical data and observation. You'll be surprised at the interesting examples, from hockey stars to plane crashes to feuding families in Kentucky and lawyers in Manhattan. Quite readable - we read it on a family trip.
Places in Between, The by Rory Stewart (100 pts)
Stewart's nonfiction account of a journalist's walk across Afghanistan without the protection of his Western identity. Even if you have read only a little about the Middle East, this will inform and intrigue you. Includes a dog story and sketches by the author, too. There is a quite small amount of "language."
Rebel with a Cause by Franklin Graham (100 pts)
Franklin Graham's very readable autobiography. It was hard for Franklin to find his own life in the shadow of a "Christian Great" such as his father, Rev. Billy Graham. A famous traveling father and a determined and creative mom make for quite a set of boundaries for a young man too rebellious for his own safety! Graham's story continues through the beginnings of Samaritan's Purse. Hard not to share some of this with your family....
Screwtape Letters, The by C. S. Lewis (100 pts)
Take your time with this series of letters from a Satanic, fallen angel to his fledgling assistant who is charged with making a new believer fail. It's short, but its fantastic concept of evil vs. good will leave you re-thinking what tempts Christians to fall as well as survive in a world designed by a good God.
Spaceman: An Astronaut's Unlikely Journey to Unlock the Secrets of the Universe by Mike Massimino (100 pts)
I have a NASA employee in my immediate family, but I didn't understand what the "big deal" about space travel was until reading this book. Mike Massimino's story of being tethered alone in space while repairing the Hubble telescope had me outside looking at the stars within days of finishing the book. It is no easy thing to become an astronaut, but Massimino is humorous and descriptive, and you will enjoy and appreciate space study after reading this.
There Is No Me Without You by Melissa Faye Green (100 pts)
Nonfiction read that blends history, medical research, personal account, and biography to tell the story of an African woman's involvement in the growing orphan crisis in Ethiopia, and what we can do about it. Author is from Decatur - very readable and personal in approach. Another book the Shumans read out loud.
Through Gates of Splendor by Elisabeth Elliot (100 pts)
Five young missionary men were killed together in the Ecuadorian jungle in the 1950s. United States citizens, whether they were church-goers or not, stopped to learn the biographies of these men who wanted to bring the Gospel to native Ecuadorans known for murdering those outside of their tribal boundaries. This book is written by the wife of one of the most quoted men, Jim Elliot. There are many photos included, used in magazines famous in the 50s. If you don't know this classic missionary story, it is a must-read!
Till We Have Faces by C. S. Lewis (100 pts)
Till We Have Faces is the last novel that Lewis wrote before his death, and is a fantasy story of friendship and faith. My students usually like the story, but are lost on the overall relevancy to Lewis's faith. Please email me for useful, brief, explanatory notes! Shumanhw@gmail.com


AP English & Comp and British Lit & Comp

Optional Reading for AP and BL - Click names for details:

Barracoon: The Story of the Last "Black Cargo" by Zora Neale Hurston (100 pts)
This brief account was recently discovered and then published in 2018. Hurston sat many hours with a gentleman named "Cudjo" who became enslaved 50 years after the slave trade was outlawed in the U.S., captured and smuggled out of African when he was 19. She gives context as he storytells through his youth, capture, enslavement, freedom, and old age. Though predictably tragic in places, there is a balance of hope and dignity found in Cudjo's love for his African culture and the family he raises later in Alabama.
Becoming by Michelle Obama (100 pts)
Former First Lady Michelle Obama tells her life story, giving personal perspective on her early days, her love of family, her improbable educational achievements, her life as a business professional, her marriage to Barack Obama, campaigning for his presidency, and their years in the White House.
Bend, Not Break by Ping Fu (100 pts)
Ping Fu grew up during the Cultural Revolution in China. I didn't know anything about this time period before reading the book, but was really caught up in her story, which is rather like a dystopia at first (think The Giver or 1984, but her story is true!). Today Ms. Fu leads a 3-D printing corporation she began here in the US, with a life in serious contrast to her incredible past growing up being indoctrinated into the Revolution's crazy world.
Black Count, The by Tom Reiss (100 pts)
Tom Reiss tells a story of General Alexander Dumas, who served with honor in the French Revolution though he was the son of a black slave and born in Haiti. Dumas's son went on to write The Count of Monte Cristo and The Three Musketeers, basing many exciting scenes on the real adventures of his father. Reiss writes that the general "rose higher in the white world than any man of his race would before our time" before he met an enemy he could not defeat . . . . This newly researched book is a good read for those who like true adventure stories.
Boy Who Harnessed the Wind, The by William Kamkwamba (100 pts)
You will like this book if you like TED talks and STEM classes, if you are interested in African life today (this takes place in Malawi), or you just like an amazing story about a student your age. The son of Christian parents, William is like my step-son Kris; he always has bolts and washers and bits of this and that in his pockets, and loves to see how things work. How can someone like this change a whole village, and maybe a whole country?
Boy Who Invented Television, The by Paul Schatzkin (100 pts)
If you like the concept of inventing something no one else could figure out as well as you (even at age 14), you will like this account of how Phil Farnsworth could "see" how to build a television. Sending sound through radio waves was one thing, but to send pictures into receivers elsewhere was puzzling great scientists around the world. Phil, growing up in the country, looked at how he plowed a field in order to get a vision for how to transmit such a picture. This biography takes you through the science, the high points, and the struggles of a brilliant man who even figured out fusion in his day, though his plans are now lost.
Boys in the Boat, The by Daniel James Brown (100 pts)
Rowing is traditionally considered a rich man's sport, but in 1936 an Olympic team from Seattle was unlike any elite crew that had ever won the US Olympic preliminary competitions. This was a time of national poverty, the Dust Bowl, and the clandestine plans of Adolf Hitler to make the 1936 games show off the wealth of his visions. This book is incredibly interesting, focusing on one tough rower and his hardworking crew in this very interesting time of history. You don't have to know rowing to enjoy the book.
Chosen, The by Chaim Potok (100 pts)
This friendship story of two Jewish boys in Brooklyn near the end of WW2 reveals different perspectives of two devout groups regarding what was next for the forming of a Jewish nation. I learned much about discussions in this faith as well as life at this time of history, thanks to Chaim Potok who is a rabbi as well as popular American author.
City of Thorns: Nine Lives in the World's Largest Refugee Camp by Ben Rawlence (100 pts)
City of Thorns is a nonfiction account of the plight of half a million people who live in Dadaab, a 30-square-mile make-shift city in the desert of Kenya. Unable to legally work or build permanent homes, residents of Dadaab have resorted to a hard life for almost 30 years. Excellent read for anyone working with refugees in Clarkston or elsewhere.
Coach Wooden and Me by Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (100 pts)
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar is the NBA's all time leading scorer and a Basketball Hall of Fame inductee. Coach Wooden has been called the "greatest coach in basketball history," and both Wooden and Abdul-Jabbar have received Presidential Medals of Freedom. In the middle of the accolades is a heart-felt story of 50 years of partnership between a wise coach and a hard-working athlete, both wanting to affect culture for good, and both with love for basketball and baseball.
Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky (200 pts)
Everyone I know who has read this book has believed it worth his time. Good theme of redemption. Try giving characters easy-to-remember nicknames to keep up with them in this Russian story - you may also find a helpful list online or in preface material that will give names and alternate names for each character. The Wall Street Journal counted it first in a list of crime thrillers.
Daughters of Islam by Miriam Adeney (100 pts)
Though I have read a number of books about Middle Eastern life and perspectives, this one was particularly helpful since it challenged some of my cookie-cutter ideas of what "missions" means. I believe it helpful for Christian women wanting to understand and communicate with Muslim neighbors.
Death of a King: The Real Story of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s Final Year by Tavis Smiley (100 pts)
Dr. King's usual biographical material is pulled from his "I have a dream" time period, but much went on in his last year of life that has not been told. Smiley writes a well researched and interesting chronology of the last 12 months, giving dignity to King's final vision and purpose.
Design of Everyday Things, The by Donald A. Norman (100 pts)
Do you get frustrated with mechanical things that do not work intuitively? Donald Norman writes a readable book of observations and guidelines, concluding that "humans do not always err. But they do when the things they use are badly conceived and designed." If you like to discover how things work, or invent/design things yourself, or just want to appreciate those who do, you will enjoy this book; it has even been included for reading in a GA Tech design class.
Endurance by Alfred Lansing (100 pts)
This is the story of Ernest Shackelton's survival as his trip across Antarctica goes against his plan. An eventful tale of 28 men and their various motivations to stay alive, and a beautiful account of a cold wasteland. Lansing's most famous book has scenes you will not forget. A book the Shumans read out loud with each other.
Extraordinary, Ordinary People by Condoleezza Rice (100 pts)
Former Secretary of State and first black woman to hold that office, Condoleezza Rice tells her story about growing up in Birmingham, Alabama, during the Civil Rights era. High school students would appreciate her inside looks into political office, attending and teaching at Stanford University, and foreign policy.
Faithful Women and Their Extraordinary God by Noël Piper (100 pts)
Five rather short but well-written bios of historic and contemporary women from various cultures: Sarah Edwards, Lilias Trotter, Gladys Aylward, Esther Ahn Kim, and Helen Roseveare. My husband couldn't help reading the last chapter out loud. The author tells their stories and then gives her own brief take-aways.
Farming of Bones, The by Edwidge Danticat (100 pts - AP Only)
Set in the Dominican Republic and Haiti in 1937. Women might be more comfortable readers of this novel. Though I try to keep summer reading positive, the struggle of Haitians in this time is worth knowing. If you have worked with refugees in Atlanta, you might be up for walking with Amabelle through her difficult story.
Gifted Hands by Ben Carson and Cecil Murphy (100 pts)
Once on everyone's reading list, this book belongs on ours. I recently reread it in two days because it was so interesting, and I loved the details of this neurosurgeon's life. Even though I'm queasy and uneducated about medical procedures, the back chapters' explanations of surgeries are understandable and exciting. Good book for family reading.
Gone: A Girl, a Violin, a Life Unstrung by Min Kym (100 pts)
This is an autobiography of a child prodigy and a story of her relationship with her instrument. Her million-dollar violin was stolen several years ago and made international news. Along with reading the book, you should hear some of the music she mentions, since the actual pieces are keyed to sections of the book and suggested for listening.
Great Quake, The: How the Biggest Earthquake in North America Changed Our Understanding of the Planet by Henry Fountain (100 pts)
Henry Fountain spent years investigating how the 1964 Alaskan earthquake affected not only people’s lives, the terrain, and local business, but also the study of how earthquakes come about on our planet. If you are science-minded—you will enjoy this book. If you aren’t but want to appreciate geology and other earth sciences, you can learn easily as you progress through a very readable account of this record-breaking event in American history and theories attached to it. We enjoyed reading it out loud!
Hard Times by Charles Dickens (100 pts)
A shorter Dickens novel. One of my friends really likes this one, so I started it three times. This summer's road trip was the winning situation; I listened to a library copy with reader Patrick Tull. This time I could follow who was who because Tull has a voice for everyone, and keeps the story going. The tale is a sometimes-dark fight between the idea that all we need for understanding are facts/science/math and the idea that imagination/the arts/wonder/questioning are intrinsic to a worthwhile life. Try this with the audio, at least to get started. I finished by reading pages, and really enjoyed the book and message.
I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban by Malala Yousafzai (100 pts)
If you have not heard of this young woman, who turned 18 in July 2015, you can skim her Wiki bio. What she tells of her family's struggles in Pakistan gives a view of what has been happening in the Middle East in the last few years. She published a new prologue in June 2015. I learned from this smart young author who does not whine as she tells her story.
It's a Jungle Out There, Life Is a Jungle, and Jungle Calls by Ron Snell (150 pts for all; they are not long.)
Nonfiction stories my family has read out loud three times now, laughing sometimes while amazed at what two brothers learn in their rainforest life and trips back to the States. This is an autobiographical account of a missionary kid and his brother growing up in Peru with a "risk-everything," ex-military father and a careful mom. These are fast-moving adventures that continue through Ron's college days in Chicago ("snakes in the dorm" and other great stories).
Life in Motion: An Unlikely Ballerina by Misty Copeland (100 pts)
Life in Motion: An Unlikely Ballerina - Misty Copeland, the American Ballet Theatre's first black principal dancer, tells of her challenge to move from a child of little privilege on through the hard choices that led her to the ABT. Very readable for those who are curious about the life of a professional ballerina or who wonder how Copeland persevered as an African American in a traditionally white field.
Macbeth, Julius Caesar, Othello, Taming of the Shrew, Midsummer Night’s Dream, The Tempest by Shakespeare (75 pts each)
Grab some friends and read these aloud? Take your time and use a Folger edition if possible to have summaries and footnotes available. Watch for quotable quotes and timeless themes. Listen along with an audio version if you wish.
One Thousand Gifts by Ann Voskamp (100 pts)
Hard to find good things to think about when you are angry? Mrs. Voskamp's journal-style writing deals honestly with her disappointments with God, even the death of her sister. Her beautiful writing style includes original words (Gerard Manley Hopkins comes to mind) and juxtaposed tones as she finds joy as a young Christian wife and mother on a Canadian farm.
Oswald Chambers: Abandoned to God by David Macasland (100 pts)
A real surprise for me! I expected an elder-statesman type of man, but found a young man talented in the arts, who focused his life and went for what was important to him in his search for truth. Brings new energy to the devotions my family often reads.
Outcasts United by Warren St. John (100 pts)
How do you coach a soccer team that speaks many languages, and has no place to practice? This is the readable story of a town, a group of refugees, and a soccer coach who gave up her family's expectations in order to make a difference in the lives of some kids in Clarkston, GA. Required reading for freshmen at GA State and GA Tech a few years ago.
Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell (100 pts; Not for AP Lang)
One out of a best-selling series of Gladwell books; this one looks at what creates success based on empirical data and observation. You'll be surprised at the interesting examples, from hockey stars to plane crashes to feuding families in Kentucky and lawyers in Manhattan. Required for AP Language, so if you plan to take that class, choose another now?
Places in Between, The by Rory Stewart (100 pts)
Stewart's nonfiction account of a journalist's walk across Afghanistan without the protection of his Western identity. Even if you have read only a little about the Middle East, this will inform and intrigue you. Includes a dog story and sketches by the author, too. There is a quite small amount of "language."
Rebel with a Cause by Franklin Graham (100 pts)
Franklin Graham's very readable autobiography. It was hard for Franklin to find his own life in the shadow of a "Christian Great" such as his father, Rev. Billy Graham. A famous traveling father and a determined and creative mom make for quite a set of boundaries for a young man too rebellious for his own safety! Graham's story continues through the beginnings of Samaritan's Purse. Hard not to share some of this with your family....
Screwtape Letters, The by C. S. Lewis (100 pts)
Take your time with this series of letters from a Satanic, fallen angel to his fledgling assistant who is charged with making a new believer fail. It's short, but its fantastic concept of evil vs. good will leave you re-thinking what tempts Christians to fall as well as survive in a world designed by a good God.
Spaceman: An Astronaut's Unlikely Journey to Unlock the Secrets of the Universe by Mike Massimino (100 pts)
I have a NASA employee in my immediate family, but I didn't understand what the "big deal" about space travel was until reading this book. Mike Massimino's story of being tethered alone in space while repairing the Hubble telescope had me outside looking at the stars within days of finishing the book. It is no easy thing to become an astronaut, but Massimino is humorous and descriptive, and you will enjoy and appreciate space study after reading this.
There Is No Me Without You by Melissa Faye Green (100 pts)
Nonfiction read that blends history, medical research, personal account, and biography to tell the story of an African woman's involvement in the growing orphan crisis in Ethiopia, and what we can do about it. Author is from Decatur - very readable and personal in approach. Another book the Shumans read out loud.
Till We Have Faces by C. S. Lewis (100 pts)
Till We Have Faces is the last novel that Lewis wrote before his death, and is a fantasy story of friendship and faith. My students usually like the story, but are lost on the overall relevancy to Lewis's faith. Please email me for useful, brief, explanatory notes! Shumanhw@gmail.com
Unashamed by Lecrae Moore (100 pts)
Learn the engaging backstory of rap​per and Grammy-winning artist Lecrae. He has a long struggle to faith in Christ, and eventually finds clear answers to many questions: Why even be a Christian? What does it mean for a Christian to affect culture? Why bother being in culture, when there is a Christian audience one could make happy?
Underground: A Human History of the Worlds beneath Our Feet by Will Hunt (100 pts)
Justin Davidson, an architecture critic for New York magazine, says of this book: "Will Hunt is an irresistible guide. I followed Underground's global tour of subterranean cultures with astonishment and joy, happy to meet a cast of cataphiles, compulsive diggers, ochre priests, spelunkers, and various seekers of the dark. I will never look at a hole in the ground in quite the same way again." Mrs. Shuman says, "My husband and I enjoyed reading this book aloud, finding ourselves under Paris, in caves in Australia, and in train tunnels in NYC. We learned a lot about why people have lived, visited, and worked beneath the surface."
Understanding Comics: The Invisible Art by Scott McCloud (100 pts)
McCloud draws every frame of this book and it is a good read whether one likes comics or not! He gives context to this art form found in many cultures and time periods, and breaks understanding of comics into idea/purpose, form, idiom, structure, craft, and surface. Just a couple of frames illustrating a particular style are objectionable, and the reader can move quickly on from them. This is a book packed with art and analysis of style, all in comic format.

The complete reading list, including instructions, is here: 2019 Summer Reading

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